Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Genetically modified food. Is it really that bad?

Almost all living creatures we use for our own benefits have been genetically modified. Think of 500 breeds of dogs, some ugly as hell, 7000 varieties of apples, many of which are inedible and 80,000 of corn. It took 10,000 years, or putting it in perspective 400 generations of humans to produce this incredible number of genetically butchered plant and animal species until someone only recently realized it did not have to be that way.


Genetic engineering is a form of breeding. Clean, thoughtful and precise – just like robotic surgery. Genetically modified organisms have their genes replaced forcefully rather than by a chance, without waiting one generation after another, with a full knowledge of what genes must be changed to give us the result we want. Genetic engineering relies on taking desirable gene from another animal or plant and placing it exactly in the right part of the chromosome. No waiting for several generations to see the results, no unpredictable characteristics in the off springs.

Here is the best thing: DNA, or the set of genes which define certain species or breeds is totally digestible. This means that once genetically modified food passes our stomachs it's DNA turns into the same mixture of amino acids and carbs that is produced from any other food source.